Pondering pi

Standard

the horizon and
my thoughts infinite-
pondering pi

This senryu or perhaps gendai was inspired by a fellow blogger and their one line poetry challenge.

http://millieho.net/2012/02/26/the-one-line-poetry-challenge/

7 responses »

  1. Leibniz Yin Yang
    one quarter pi
    +1 – 1/3 + 1/5 – 1/7 + 1/9 – 1/11 + 1/13 – 1/15…

    π/4
    Needs three to contemplate together:
    A flower holds a 1 in mind
    Jack has in mind 1/5 + 1/9 + 1/13 + 1/17…
    Jill has in mind 1/3 + 1/7 + 1/11 + 1/15…
    Flower + Jack – Jill … forever

  2. I never understood this: In a thought experiment, draw a 1 foot diameter circle. Draw the circle and the diameter line through the center. Since it is a thought experiment, it can be exactly 1 foot — not approximately 1 foot with a margin of error of .oooooo1 or whatever — no, 1 foot diameter with no fraction. Cut open the circle and lay it flat. Put the diameter line along side it. Duplicate the diameter line as needed. You will find you can fit 3 of the diameters along the other line, There is some unknown fraction left along the length of the circumference line. Create one more exact 1 foot line. Fit one end in with the other 3 and bend it at the edge of the circumference line. Now break it at the end. When you break an ideal real line you get a fraction of a line, a terminating fraction, not the sum of a series. But yet, math says that you can not calculate such a fraction exactly, unless you have an infinite amount of time to do the calculation. And they have proven that no such exact single fraction exists. The broken off piece in the math can’t be measured. But we bent it in a precise location on a standard measurable line. The math adds an endless series of fractions. Wherever you stop is going to be an approximation. In the thought experiment, the break point is known.

      • Thanks, Fiercebuddhist. So many impossible things seem to be proven true but it’s hard to understand what a seeming contradiction is saying about the larger perspective. Maybe I can find one of my old math books and try again.

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